How to Immigrate to Canada as a Teacher

Every progressive nation like the UK, US, and Canada recognize the roles that teachers play in society. They’ve helped mold world leaders and extend the reach of literacy. 

It’s not surprising that there is currently a growing demand for teachers in Canada and they’re rewarded handsomely. Educators can earn around $60,000 – $100,000 per annum depending on their experience.

The Requirements for Applying as a Teacher in Canada

These are some of the basic requirements for each province:

  • A valid job offer
  • At least 2 years of work experience
  • Travel document
  • Teaching qualification that meets the Canadian standard
  • Work reference letter
  • Proficiency in English or French
  • Clean criminal record
  • Qualify for a provincial teaching certificate
  • Proof of identities such as a passport or an ID.

You will likely wait for up to 120 days after submitting your documents.

Make sure that you check the specific requirements for the province you want to apply to.

Immigrating to Canada as a teacher through the PNP

Every country has educational boards that determine the type of teacher they need. So, be clear about the province you want to settle in before you arrive in Canada.

The Provincial Nomination Program (PNP) is the easiest route to move to Canada. The Express Entry System is based on a point-based system. Try to have at least 67 points to boost your chances of getting an Invitation to Apply (ITA) for permanent residency.

Here are some of the top immigration tips for immigrants who are planning to enter Canada as a teacher.

1.        Discover your NOC teaching code

Search for the NOC code that suits your job on the Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada website. Canada recognizes teachers that are under the following categories:

  • Educational resource assistant
  • Teaching aid
  • Supply teacher
  • Teaching assistant
  • ELS teacher
  • Biology teacher
  • Remedial aid
  • Librarian. 

Applicants who are yet to complete their educational programs are not eligible. However, they can apply for any of the educational courses in a Canadian institution. You will be able to teach pre-school to k12 pupils upon graduation.

Check out some jobs that don’t require a teaching certificate:

  • International language teachers
  • Education assistants
  • Early childhood daycare teachers
  • Music teachers
  • Adult continuing education teacher
  • University lecturers (must possess either a Master’s or Ph.D.)
  • Tutors
  • Private language instructors.

2.        Getting a reference letter

Presenting a reference letter when applying for a teaching job in Canada comes with several benefits. It’s a document that shows your work history and recommendations from your past employers. A reference letter will also come in handy when applying to a graduate school for a sponsorship or a grant.

Many immigrants rely on the services of expert consultants who understand the intricacy of the Canadian immigration system. They will provide the right answers to your questions at any stage of the application process.

3.        Cost of living in Canada

The immigration officers are interested in how each immigrant intends to start their life once they arrive in Canada. You must also make adequate preparations for any dependent early on. Be ready to show the cost of living proof to convince the authorities that you have the financial capability to live comfortably in Canada.

4.        Automatic dismissal

An application will be denied instantly due to any of the following reasons:

  • Possession of a human/international rights violation
  • Exhibiting any contagious health condition
  • Having any discrepancy in your application
  • Inability to provide proof of financial security
  • A criminal history
  • DUI convictions as a result of drugs or alcohol
  • Being linked to an organized crime
  • Failure to comply with Canada’s Immigration and Refugee Protection Act or IRPA.

1 comment

  • This is very good programme for eligible immigrants..how will you get schooling and you’re immigrant?